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yourfanat wrote: I am using another tool for Oracle developers - dbForge Studio for Oracle. This IDE has lots of usefull features, among them: oracle designer, code competion and formatter, query builder, debugger, profiler, erxport/import, reports and many others. The latest version supports Oracle 12C. More information here.
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Linux Reaches the Bottom Line
Linux Developers Shift the Course of an Industry

(July 9, 2003) - It’s 2:00AM, the Coca-Cola buzz is starting to fade and it’s been hours since Domino’s Pizza came calling. The only light is the white glow emanating from the monitor. It’s time to run the last test and – poof - the system crashes. Welcome to the all-too-familiar world of software developers.

They’re a breed unto themselves. The geeks. The nerds. The trendsetters. That’s right - the trendsetters. This motley crew is the driving force behind a revolution. Developers from around the world have shifted the course of the IT industry.

Like most revolutions, it started small. A young developer by the name of Linus Torvalds got tired of dealing with commercial operating systems like Windows and set off to create his own platform. But instead of keeping his operating system to himself, he made Linux open to all the geeks on the Net so the best and brightest minds in the development community could look at the code and make it better. He wasn’t the first person to use this open method for developing software, but his little chunk of code has certainly been among the most successful.

The popularity of Linux has been unprecedented. It continues to be the fastest growing server operating system in the world. The primary driver for its success is the development community.

The development community collectively created a highly reliable, low cost operating system. Over the last couple of years as businesses from a variety of industries realized the benefits of Linux, they turned to the developer community to create applications, like e-commerce, banking, accounting, customer relationship management, and inventory management systems that support the open source operating system.

The geeks have responded in full force. In the last few months, the number of new Linux-based applications has skyrocketed. PeopleSoft is moving its entire application portfolio - over 170 diffrent applications – to Linux. IBM alone has seen a huge shift in the number of corporate developers and Independent Software Vendors creating Linux-based applications to run on its software, like WebSphere, DB2, Lotus and Tivoli. Over 50,000 developers have cranked out more than 6500 Linux-based applications built on IBM software. Developers are clearly moving applications to Linux at a rapid rate, but that’s not the only thing they’re doing with Linux.

Developers are embracing Linux on multiple fronts.

As software vendors, developers see the opportunity to impact their bottom line and add incremental revenue by porting their existing applications to run on Linux. Look at ACCPAC. They deliver one of the leading accounting software offerings around. By supporting just one operating system, like Windows, they might go head-to-head with Great Plains, another accounting software vendor. But ACCPAC is looking to get an edge over the competition.

Now ACCPAC supports both Windows and Linux. For all the mid-sized companies that are moving to Linux - software vendors like ACCPAC, who have ported their applications to Linux, are the only accounting software in town, because their major competition doesn’t support the open source operating system. For these software vendors, it is a business decision to support Linux to help drive incremental revenue beyond the Windows market.

Developers are also starting to use Linux instead of Windows as their development environment of choice - they’re saying, "Bye-bye system crashes. Adios reboots. Hello Linux." In a recent report from an Evans Data study, more than half of Linux developers, 52%, formerly wrote primarily for Windows, while only 30% came from Unix.

The reasons for the shift boil down to reliability, low cost, and the fact that Linux easily ports to a variety of different servers. Developers can create a Linux-based application and it can run on Intel-based servers, all the way up the chain to the mainframe. Windows-based apps don’t have that level of flexibility - they can’t run on the big iron, which is a staple in large enterprises.

The open movement started with the development community and as the popularity of Linux has crossed over to CTO offices around the globe - developers are delivering the applications for retail, finance, government, and manufacturing businesses to function more efficiently.

Just a handful of years ago no one would have imagined that Linux, "The Little Operating System That Could," would alter the course of the IT industry and become the de facto development platform for the next decade.

Flexibility and choice are the drivers in today’s marketplace. The geeks set the trend. I for one can’t wait to see where they take us next.

About Scott Handy
Scott Handy is currently the Vice President, Worldwide Corporate Linux Strategy. He has held numerous executive, technical sales, marketing, and strategy positions covering Large Accounts, Channels, Small and Medium Business, and IBM solutions for Windows NT, Sun Solaris, and OS/2 Warp. He has been with IBM for over 19 years and is currently based out of Somers, New York.

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Reader Feedback: Page 1 of 1

If I hear linux referred to one more time as "the upstart operating system" or "the little os that could" I will start swinging...

Free counts for a lot. Free plus good tools, great stability and an abundance of codebases works as well. For example, we have created a customized web report delivery system for our clients with Postgres, Apache and Perl using Linux boxes. Part of the web server was a modification to SquirrelMail -- we changed it to read from a database instead of an IMAP server. The cost was nothing but some elbow grease. To do the same in Windows would have been the same amount of work plus software license fees for the OS, application and development environments. As we scale up and create both database and web farms to service the growth of our client base, the cost of licensing Linux remains $0 while the cost of Windows increases dramatically. On top of that, I don't need Windows' legendary stability issues breaking this product.

It is no surprise that Linux is starting to take over the market place as we have been here before in the computer industry. This is like a case of history repeating itself.
When IBM licenced its "IBM PC" technology to 3rd party hardware manufacturers to build "IBM Clones" the clones took over the desktop and with it, the home PC market.
Apple, probably the their biggest competitor stayed proprietry and lost out.
Everyone knows that Microsoft were lucky enough to ride on the backs of the IBM giant by writing the disk operating software that IBM couldn't be bothered to do themselves - but thats another story.

This also happened in the PC-games industry. There was ONE game that set the PC-games industry on fire and left all the others behind - DOOM!
And this game could be played for free (at least the shareware version), fully playable levels that could be played for hours. Almost all other games were years behind in sophistication and all you could do with them was look at the screenshots - or the box. The other games stayed proprietry and lost out.

The first time I booted a Linux kernel, it reminded me of something. It reminded me of the game DOOM loading in DOS - that might be why I like Linux so much - I used to like DOS.

The whole idea with Linux being free, like free beer and free, like free speech gives it the competitive edge. It runs on anything, it is progressing at an alarming rate and any company that remains proprietry with Linux around could lose out.


Your Feedback
joel stone wrote: If I hear linux referred to one more time as "the upstart operating system" or "the little os that could" I will start swinging...
Henry Jenkins wrote: Free counts for a lot. Free plus good tools, great stability and an abundance of codebases works as well. For example, we have created a customized web report delivery system for our clients with Postgres, Apache and Perl using Linux boxes. Part of the web server was a modification to SquirrelMail -- we changed it to read from a database instead of an IMAP server. The cost was nothing but some elbow grease. To do the same in Windows would have been the same amount of work plus software license fees for the OS, application and development environments. As we scale up and create both database and web farms to service the growth of our client base, the cost of licensing Linux remains $0 while the cost of Windows increases dramatically. On top of that, I don't need Windows' legendary stability issues breaking this product.
Twid wrote: It is no surprise that Linux is starting to take over the market place as we have been here before in the computer industry. This is like a case of history repeating itself. When IBM licenced its "IBM PC" technology to 3rd party hardware manufacturers to build "IBM Clones" the clones took over the desktop and with it, the home PC market. Apple, probably the their biggest competitor stayed proprietry and lost out. Everyone knows that Microsoft were lucky enough to ride on the backs of the IBM giant by writing the disk operating software that IBM couldn't be bothered to do themselves - but thats another story. This also happened in the PC-games industry. There was ONE game that set the PC-games industry on fire and left all the others behind - DOOM! And this game could be played for free (at least the shareware version), fully playable levels that could be played for hours. Almost...
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