Comments
yourfanat wrote: I am using another tool for Oracle developers - dbForge Studio for Oracle. This IDE has lots of usefull features, among them: oracle designer, code competion and formatter, query builder, debugger, profiler, erxport/import, reports and many others. The latest version supports Oracle 12C. More information here.
Cloud Expo on Google News
SYS-CON.TV

2008 West
DIAMOND SPONSOR:
Data Direct
SOA, WOA and Cloud Computing: The New Frontier for Data Services
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Red Hat
The Opening of Virtualization
GOLD SPONSORS:
Appsense
User Environment Management – The Third Layer of the Desktop
Cordys
Cloud Computing for Business Agility
EMC
CMIS: A Multi-Vendor Proposal for a Service-Based Content Management Interoperability Standard
Freedom OSS
Practical SOA” Max Yankelevich
Intel
Architecting an Enterprise Service Router (ESR) – A Cost-Effective Way to Scale SOA Across the Enterprise
Sensedia
Return on Assests: Bringing Visibility to your SOA Strategy
Symantec
Managing Hybrid Endpoint Environments
VMWare
Game-Changing Technology for Enterprise Clouds and Applications
Click For 2008 West
Event Webcasts

2008 West
PLATINUM SPONSORS:
Appcelerator
Get ‘Rich’ Quick: Rapid Prototyping for RIA with ZERO Server Code
Keynote Systems
Designing for and Managing Performance in the New Frontier of Rich Internet Applications
GOLD SPONSORS:
ICEsoft
How Can AJAX Improve Homeland Security?
Isomorphic
Beyond Widgets: What a RIA Platform Should Offer
Oracle
REAs: Rich Enterprise Applications
Click For 2008 Event Webcasts
A Developer’s Perspective | @DevOpsSummit #DevOps #APM #Monitoring
Since moving to a model where developers own their services, there’s a lot more developer independence

A Developer's Perspective
By Eric Sigler

"Walking over to the Ops room - I don't feel like I ever need to do that anymore."

In the run up to our latest release of capabilities for developers, I sat down with David Yang, a senior engineer here at PagerDuty who's seen our internal architecture evolve from a single monolithic codebase to dozens of microservices. He's the technical lead for our Incident Management - People team, which owns the services that deliver alert notifications to all 8,000+ PagerDuty customers. We sat down and talked about life after switching to teams owning the operations of their services. Here are some observations about the benefits and drawbacks we've seen:

On life now that teams own their services:
Since moving to a model where developers own their services, there's a lot more developer independence. A side effect is that we've minimized the difficulties in provisioning and managing infrastructure. Now, the team wants to optimize for the least amount of obstacles and roadblocks. Supporting infrastructure teams are geared toward providing better self-service tools to minimize the need for human intervention.

The shift to having developers own their code reduces cycle time from when someone says, "this is a problem," to when they can actually fix the problem, which has been invaluable.

On cultural change:
By having people own more of the code, and have more responsibility in general for the systems they operate, you essentially push for a culture that's more driven towards getting roadblocks out of the way - like each team is more optimized towards, "how can I make sure I'm not ever blocked again" or "not blocked in the future." It's a lot more apparent when we are blocked. Before, I had to ask ops every time we wanted to provision hosts, and I just accepted it. Now my team can see its roadblocks better because they aren't hidden by other teams' roadblocks.

We have teams that are focused a lot more on owning the whole process of delivering customer value from end to end, which is invaluable.

On how this can help with the incident response process:
There are clearer boundaries of service ownership. It's easier to figure out which specific teams are impacted when there's an operability issue. And the fact that I know the exact procedure to follow - and it's more of an objective procedure of, "this is the checklist" - that is great. It enables me to focus 100% on solving the problem and not on the communication around the incident.

On what didn't work so well:
Not to say that owning a service doesn't come with its own set of problems. It requires dedicated time to tend to the operational maintenance of our services.  This ultimately takes up more of the team's time, which is especially an issue with legacy services where they may be knowledge gaps. In the beginning, we didn't put strong enough guardrails in place to protect operability work in our sprints. That's being improved by leveraging KPIs [such as specific scaling goals and operational load levels] to enable us to make objective decisions.

On the future:
[Of balancing operations-related work vs. feature development work] teams are asking: "How do I leverage all of this stuff day-to-day? How do I make even more objective decisions?" - and driving to those objective decisions by metrics.

Everything in our product development is defined in, "what is customer value", "what is success criteria," etc. I think trying to convey the operational work in the same sense helps make it easier to prioritize effectively. We're all on the same team and aligned to the same goal of delivering value to our customers, and you have to resolve the competing priorities at some point.

Trying to enact change within an organization around operations requires a lot of collaboration. It also takes figuring out what the right metrics are and having a discussion about those metrics.


Image: "Magnifying glass" is copyright (c) 2013 Todd Chandler

The post A Developer's Perspective appeared first on PagerDuty.

Read the original blog entry...

About PagerDuty Blog
PagerDuty’s operations performance platform helps companies increase reliability. By connecting people, systems and data in a single view, PagerDuty delivers visibility and actionable intelligence across global operations for effective incident resolution management. PagerDuty has over 100 platform partners, and is trusted by Fortune 500 companies and startups alike, including Microsoft, National Instruments, Electronic Arts, Adobe, Rackspace, Etsy, Square and Github.

Latest AJAXWorld RIA Stories
DX World EXPO, LLC, a Lighthouse Point, Florida-based startup trade show producer and the creator of "DXWorldEXPO® - Digital Transformation Conference & Expo" has announced its executive management team. The team is headed by Levent Selamoglu, who has been named CEO. "Now is the ...
Companies are harnessing data in ways we once associated with science fiction. Analysts have access to a plethora of visualization and reporting tools, but considering the vast amount of data businesses collect and limitations of CPUs, end users are forced to design their structu...
"Akvelon is a software development company and we also provide consultancy services to folks who are looking to scale or accelerate their engineering roadmaps," explained Jeremiah Mothersell, Marketing Manager at Akvelon, in this SYS-CON.tv interview at 21st Cloud Expo, held Oct ...
In his session at 21st Cloud Expo, James Henry, Co-CEO/CTO of Calgary Scientific Inc., introduced you to the challenges, solutions and benefits of training AI systems to solve visual problems with an emphasis on improving AIs with continuous training in the field. He explored app...
The question before companies today is not whether to become intelligent, it’s a question of how and how fast. The key is to adopt and deploy an intelligent application strategy while simultaneously preparing to scale that intelligence. In her session at 21st Cloud Expo, Sangeeta...
Subscribe to the World's Most Powerful Newsletters
Subscribe to Our Rss Feeds & Get Your SYS-CON News Live!
Click to Add our RSS Feeds to the Service of Your Choice:
Google Reader or Homepage Add to My Yahoo! Subscribe with Bloglines Subscribe in NewsGator Online
myFeedster Add to My AOL Subscribe in Rojo Add 'Hugg' to Newsburst from CNET News.com Kinja Digest View Additional SYS-CON Feeds
Publish Your Article! Please send it to editorial(at)sys-con.com!

Advertise on this site! Contact advertising(at)sys-con.com! 201 802-3021


SYS-CON Featured Whitepapers
ADS BY GOOGLE